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Fish exporters

If you are an exporter or supplier of fish or other seafood, you have to use the same documentation.

An exporter in this respect means a company that issues certificates of origin in connection with exports.

What characterises a supplier is that it primarily supplies originating materials or originating products to exporters. As proof of origin, they will issue a supplier's declaration.

Both exporters and suppliers are subject to the same requirements to document the origin of the products for which they issue documentation of origin.

Exporters/suppliers can again be divided into two main groups - producers and traders. Some companies can operate both as producers and distributors. In this context, a producer is defined as someone who has manufactured export goods in accordance with the requirements that are laid down in the applicable free trade agreement.

It must be possible to track the goods in the export document from the arrival of the raw materials, through any production and all the way to the date of export. These are conditions that you, as an exporter, need to address before issuing a certificate of origin.

You have no other underlying documents than a supplier;s declaration? The supplier who has issued it must have underlying documentation in support of its declaration.

Approved exporters

An approved exporter is an exporter who has been approved by the customs authorities to issue Origin Declarations regardless of the value of the originating product. Exporters who do not have such permission may only use Origin Declarations when the value of the originating product does not exceed NOK 50,000.

Where does the export go?

Crew requirements in free trade agreements

Fish exports are in many cases subject to the requirement that the goods must be wholly obtained  in the exporting country. As regards fish caught outside the customs area, the requirement is that the catch must be made by "their vessels", i.e. the vessels of the contracting parties. Norway is working to make the "flag rule" decisive in all negotiations, but most agreements also contain requirements, among other things, for crew nationality. Below is a list of the requirements that apply in connection with export to the various contracting parties. When a 75% rule is stipulated, officers are counted as part of the crew. It is the citizenship that determines the nationality.

With the EU:

- "The Fishing Letter": All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from Norway or an EU member state.

- Compensation agreements: All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from Norway or an EU member state.

-The EEA Agreement: All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from Norway, Iceland or an EU member state. 

With the PEM Zone (Albania, the Faroe Islands, Switzerland, Egypt, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Ukraine, Georgia): All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from and EFTA member state or the respective contracting party.

With Iceland:

  • The EFTA Convention: All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from an EFTA member state.
  • The EEA Agreement: All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from Norway, Iceland or an EU member state.

With Canada, Chile, Peru, Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama: No crew requirements.

With Mexico: All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from an EFTA member state or Mexico.

With South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong and the member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates) and the South African Customs Union (Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland, South Africa and Lesotho): No crew requirements.

With the Philippines: All officers and at least 75% of the crews must come from the exporting contracting party.