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Entry- and Exit Summary Declaration mandatory

The Customs worldwide are focused on the security of international supply chains. Measures to secure the supply chain include the submission of advanced notice in electronic form, risk assessment and risk mitigation by Customs authorities.

Customs security takes into account the particularities of both the means of transport and the shipments crossing the Norwegian border to and from third countries (i.e. other countries than EU Member States and Switzerland).

Who should provide advanced notice?

The carrier who transports goods across the border to or from a third country is responsible for providing advanced notice to the Customs authorities in the form of an Entry- or Exit Summary Declaration. The persons involved in the supply chain (carrier, agent, importer, exporter, declarant …) must agree on how to exchange information and decide on who will submit the advanced notice to the Customs authorities.

How do you lodge the advanced notice?

Advanced notice in the form of an Entry- or Exit Summary Declaration shall be lodged into the NCTS-system. The information can be provided either as a separate Entry- or Exit Summary Declaration or in combination with a Transit Declaration. If you use the combined declaration, regular transit procedures apply in accordance with the regulations of the Transit Convention.

Direct transport between Norway and third country

For all shipments crossing the Norwegian border directly from a third country an Entry Summary Declaration shall be lodged before arriving at the border and according to the prescribed deadlines.

For all shipments crossing the Norwegian border directly to a third country an Exit Summary Declaration shall be lodged before leaving the country and according to the prescribed deadlines.

Shipments from a third country entering into Norway and passing further

A combined Entry Summary/Transit Declaration could be lodged for shipments transported by road from the Customs Office of Entry to another Customs Office of Destination in Norway or further to a Customs Office of Destination in EU or Switzerland. In this way, you can use the transit procedure further to the final destination within the security area. The TSAD (Transit Security Accompanying Document) with MRN and barcode must be printed and follow the shipment.

Shipments from Norway to a third country passing through EU (indirect transport)

Advanced notice in the form of an Exit Summary Declaration has to be submitted at the Customs Office of Exit in EU.

For shipments transported by road however, a combined Exit Summary / Transit Declaration can be submitted to the Customs Office of Departure in Norway instead. In this case the Customs Office of Destination needs to be the same as the Customs Office of Exit in the EU. The TSAD (Transit Security Accompanying Document) with MRN and barcode must be printed and follow the shipment. You must ensure that the transit procedure is completed at the Customs Office of Destination in accordance with the transit rules. In addition, you must ensure that the TSAD is presented at the Customs Office of Exit to prove that advanced notice has been lodged and risk analysis has been completed at the Customs Office of Departure.

Regulations

Please refer to Section 3-1-1 – 3.1.7 in the Regulations to the Act on Customs Duties and Movement of Goods (Customs Regulations) for information on exemptions, time limits etc. regulations_to_the_act_on_customs_duties_and_movement_of_goods_april17.pdfhere. (1.3 MB)

Risk assessment

The Customs authorities perform risk assessment of all advance notices lodged in NCTS. Risk assessment related to safety and security is carried out to safeguard the global trade. In some cases, inspection of documents and/or goods may be necessary.

Background

In 2005 the World Customs Organisation (WCO) adopted the SAFE Framework of Standards (SAFE FoS) that introduced security measures for supply chains, including the requirement of advanced cargo data, security risk assessment and an industry partnership program (Authorised Economic Operator / AEO).

EU included security aspects in their Customs regulation in 2005 and 2006 (Regulation (EC) 648/2005, 1875/2006). This led to the requirement to submit electronic data before the arrival of goods into the EU (Entry Summary Declaration) and before the departure of goods out from the EU (Exit Summary Declaration), the introduction of the Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) program and the establishment of common risk assessment.

Security aspects were first introduced in customs legislation in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in September 2001 in the United States. This focus was strengthened after the Yemen Incident in October 2010 where a shipment containing improvised explosive devices was found onboard of an air plane transiting the EU towards the US. The relevance of Customs Security has been underlined by global security concerns caused by recent terrorist incidents. The “Punta Cana Resolution” adopted by the WCO Policy Commission in December 2015 encourages customs authorities to enhance security measures and advocates closer cooperation at national and international level and with other authorities.

Negotiations between Norway and the EU led to an agreement that Norway was included in the EU security area from 1 July 2009. protocol10.pdfThis agreement is incorporated into Protocol 10 of the EEA Agreement .

An equivalent security agreement has been agreed between EU and Switzerland. Thereafter, a bilateral agreement has been concluded between Norway and Switzerland similar to that of Norway and Switzerland with the EU.

Followingly the obligation to give advance notice does not apply to goods coming directly from or going directly to, the customs territory of the European Union or the Swiss customs territory and its customs enclaves.